Program

Tuesday, September 1st 2020

  • -

    Registration

  • -

    Welcome address

  • -

    Lecture: Hugo Bellen

  • -

    Coffee break

  • -

    Lecture: Fernanda Ceriani

  • -

    Welcome Reception

Wednesday, September 2nd 2020

  • -

    Lecture: Marc Freeman

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Coffee break

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Lunch and Poster session - Odd

  • -

    Lecture: Barbara Webb

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Coffee break

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Dinner and Poster session - Even

Thursday, September 3rd 2020

  • -

    Lecture: Ilona Grunwaldkadow

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Coffee break

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Lunch and Poster session - Even

  • -

    Lecture: Jens Januschke

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Coffee break

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Symposium Speakers

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Dinner and Poster session - Even

Friday, September 4th 2020

  • -

    Lecture: Alex Gould

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Coffee break

  • -

    Selected abstracts

  • -

    Closing remarks

  • Thursday, September 3rd 2020: Gala Dinner - To Be Advice

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Hugo Bellen

HHMI - Baylor College of Medicine- Huston


Opening Session

He is interested in (1) providing a better fundamental understanding of the biology that governs the proper function and maintenance of neurons in aging adults (2) developing tools that can be applied to most genes to control transcript and protein levels in adult neurons to assess which proteins are required for neuronal survival and proper function (3) creating genome wide libraries to manipulate most genes in vivo. My lab uses the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system because most biological processes are evolutionarily conserved and studies in fruit flies provide many important clues about the aging process in animals and human diseases.

Alex Gould

Crick Institute- London


He is interested in how the environment shapes our physiology and metabolism and how this impacts upon health and disease. His research focuses on identifying the protective mechanisms that allow developing and adult animals to cope with environmental challenges such as malnutrition and oxidative stress. This research also aims to shed light on the complex interactions between environmental factors and the genes influencing metabolic and age-related diseases.

Barbara Webb

University of Edinburgh


Her research is about modeling the sensorimotor capabilities of insects. This ranges from simple reflexive behaviors such as the phonotaxis of crickets, to more complex capabilities such as multimodal integration, navigation and learning. We carry out behavioral experiments on insects, but principally work on computational models of the underlying neural mechanisms, which are often embedded on robot hardware.

Fernanda Ceriani

Instituto Leloir- Buenos Aires


The circadian clock sets the timing for gene expression, cell metabolism, physiology and behavior to the most critical moments in the day, thus contributing to the organism’s adaptation to a changing environment. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological clock at a cell-autonomous level have been explored at length, most organisms from invertebrates to mammals rely on the coordinated action of different oscillators that are localized in neuronal clusters in the adult brain, and even in different tissues. How the different oscillators in the brain are coupled and synchronize peripheral oscillators to render a coherent output remains largely unexplored in both invertebrate and mammals. One of the long-term goals of our laboratory is to unravel the molecular and cellular basis underlying the control of rhythmic physiology and behavior, and how these properties change throughout life under normal or pathological circumstances, such as aging or neurodegeneration; we employ Drosophila as the model system.